Respecting Time Investment

Games

Time is a critically important resource. It’s hard to find uninterrupted chunks of time to put towards playing games. When players choose to play your game, you should do everything in your power to use their time respectfully. In this post, I’ll examine thoughts from several games-industry thinkers on the efficient use of time.

Game Design Showdown: Sherlock Holmes

Games

After watching the BBC’s excellent adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, I’ve been on the lookout for any other media that riffs on the same source material. I’ve settled on two games: Sherlock Holmes: Crimes and Punishments and Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective. In this post I will compare the two experiences, attempting to highlight what mystery games can learn from them in the future.

Working Within Working Memory

Games

When designing games, it’s easy to add complexity. You can always come up with yet another feature to add to a game. However, some of the best game designers would argue that their craft is all about taking things out of their games. Indeed, most games that stand the test of time have elegant rule sets. These games are easy to learn because they have few rules, but hard to master because of what’s known as emergent gameplay—complexity that arises from the interplay of relatively simple rules.